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Peacock Bass ID Guide

An Anglers Guide to the
Recognized Species of Peacock Bass

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'Tucunare Amarela'Cichla kelberi

Amazon Peacock Bass species Cichla kelberi
Cichla intermedia

Cichla kelberi is one of the newly described (2006) species of Cichla.

ID Key: C. Kelberi is similar to both C. monoculus and C. pleiozona, with three distinct dark vertical bars on its sides and without dark opercular markings. Small light spots on the lower fins distinguish it from other species. Large specimens possess a distinct occipital bar.

Identification Keys
Bars and Markings Colors Size Key Characters Similar Species
Has three distinct dark vertical bars on its sides and is without dark opercular markings. Small light spots on the lower fins distinguish it from other species. Yellowish/gold sides, especially posteriorly. Head greenish. Lower fins reddish olive. Orange/red markings at lower edge of operculum. Juveniles:

Adults:
Depth to length ratio: approx. 32%

Lateral Line Scales: approx. 80
Most similar to
C. pleiozona
C. monoculus
Angler's Summary
Known Range Behavior Notes Habitat Common Names IGFA records
Countries: Brazil.

River Basins: Rio Araguaia and lower Rio Tocantins basins. Also introduced in reservoirs in Eastern and Northern Brazil.
See Below In low gradient rivers, C. kelberi occupy shallow, lentic habitats (lagoons). English:
Yellow peacock bass

Local: tucunare amarela
tucunare comum.
Currently None

Fishing Tactics

Stuart Willis reports on his experience with C. kelberi:

"We fished for these near Sao Felix, where the Rio das Mortes encounters the Araguaia. This is a clear, sandy, low-gradient, meandering floodplain river, with many lagoons and channels. C. piquiti and C. kelberi seem to divide ecological space not unlike C. temensis and C. monoculus in the Negro, or C. temensis and C. orinocensis in the Orinoco. That is, C. piquiti are larger, appear to occupy deeper habitats with more flow (e.g. channels), while C. kelberi are more often in smaller, shallower or lentic habitats (e.g. lagoons). We caught both on silver weedless spoons, my standard fare (the idiot-proof lure, I guess). Locals called these fishes tucunare branca (C. piquiti), and tucunare amarela (C. kelberi), and only the large, sexually mature C. piquiti acquire the bluish fins, and hence the appellation tucunare azul."

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