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Peacock Bass ID Guide

An Anglers Guide to the
Recognized Species of Peacock Bass

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'tucunare pinima'Cichla pinima

Amazon Peacock Bass species Cichla pinima
Cichla pinima

Cichla pinima is one of the newly described (2006) species of Cichla.

ID Key: C. pinima

Identification Keys
Bars and Markings Colors Size Key Characters Similar Species
Possesses three prominent dark vertical bars or blotches in adults. Dark markings on operculum are present. Juveniles have 4 or more horizontal rows of light spots. Possesses three prominent dark vertical bars or blotches in adults. Dark markings on operculum are present. Juveniles have 4 or more horizontal rows of light spots. Our recent exploratory trips to the Rio Piranima have yielded specimens up to 15 pounds. Depth to length ratio: approx. 27%

Lateral Line Scales: approx. 95
Most similar to
C. temensis
C. jariina
C. thyrorus
C. vazzoleri
Angler's Summary
Known Range Behavior Notes Habitat Common Names IGFA records
Countries: Brazil.

River Basins: lower Rio Tapajos, Rio Curua-Una, lower Rio Xingu, lower Rio Tocantins and Rio Capim. Also introduced in other locations in Brazil's northeast
They relate strongly to the edges of flooded igapo, in both river and lagoon environments, coming out to attack baits. C. pinima are fairly abundant along the shorelines, in amongst woody structure in low-gradient rivers. pinima is a Tupi-Guarani Indian word meaning white-spotted. The name was in use prior to the 2006 revision None

Fishing Tactics;
 

Rio Piranima — C. pinima exploratory trip report.

These fish similar, in many ways to C. temensis, (although smaller), offer much the same fishing experience on subsurface baits, especially the peacock rattle jig. Attacking with powerful strikes, they immediately head for the nearest cover. Although not quite as readily taken on topwaters as C. temensis, they will explode on well-presented Zara Spooks and prop baits. Although locals claimed that they could reach 9 kilos (almost 19 pounds), the largest we encountered on our first exploration in their habitat was 15 pounds. We hope to find the giants the locals describe on our next visit  to this fishery in 2017.

C. pinima—Report by Dr. Stuart Willis:

"We angled these in the Araguari River downstream of Ferreira Gomes in Amapa. This clearwater river, downstream of FG, is a low-gradient floodplain river, and is also heavily tidally influenced. C. pinima were fairly abundant along the shore, in amongst the woody structure. We caught these on weedless spoons. The people I spoke with called this species "tucunare acu" and C. monoculus, with which C. pinima is largely co-distributed, 'tucunare chinga'."

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